Webinars

Methane Emissions from Thermokarst Lakes

Katey Walter Anthony, Water & Environmental Research Center

This presentation examines the role and importance of permafrost melt in the release of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere.

Moose and caribou in the face of climate change: winners or losers?

Kris Hundertmark, University of Alaska Fairbanks

This presentation looks at factors involved in evaluating the impact of future climate change on moose and also presents the results of a recent study that predicts changes in the genetic diversity of caribou relative to changing climate.

NOAA Climate.gov: An Audience-Focused Approach to Public Communication

David Herring, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Director of Communications & Education, NOAA Climate Program Office

Climate.gov is NOAA's primary online source of science and information for a climate-smart nation. This presentation will feature a high-level overview of the site, lessons learned, and plans for its future evolution.

Ocean Acidification: Perceptions, Risks and Uncertainties

Jeremy Mathis, Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory & Ocean Acidification Research Center University of Alaska Fairbanks

Fisheries in Alaska are located in seas projected to experience ocean acidification (OA). We describe the current patterns of dependence on marine resources that could be negatively impacted by OA and the risk to Alaska’s fishery sector.

Ocean Acidification: What it Means to Alaska

Jeremy Mathis, Professor, School of Fisheries and Ocean Sciences, University of Alaska Fairbanks

In this presentation, the controls and seasonal distribution of ocean acidification around Alaska will be discussed in the context of the import commercial fisheries.

Permafrost Degradation and Monitoring in Alaska

Kenji Yoshikawa, University of Alaska

Join us to learn about mechanisms of permafrost thaw and how this school-based monitoring project is helping us understand permafrost degradation in Alaska.

Precipitation trends in Alaska: Data limitations and complex controls

Stephanie A McAfee, University of Nevada, Reno

Existing studies of precipitation trends in Alaska simply did not agree about the magnitude or even direction of trends. We revisited the question, analyzing homogeneity and trends in station data and three commonly used gridded precipitation data sets.


Alaska Center for Climate Assessment & Policy



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ACCAP is a NOAA Climate Program Office Climate & Societal Interactions RISA Program.





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