Focus Areas

Assessment of the Application of Climate Information in Wildfire Management and Decision-Making in Alaska

Beginning in January 2016, Melanie will be conducting research to reflexively measure and evaluate the process of science co-production and communication within this context. Specifically, she will investigate the decision contexts of wildfire management in Alaska, explore organizational frameworks for connecting science with users, analyze the innovation of decision-support services and evolution of use-inspired science, and contribute to generalizable knowledge to inform decisions through science application.

Project Report: Current Coastal Change Projects and Priority Information Needs in Western Alaska

Publication Date: 
June 2015

The report documents the project landscape for communities facing change, decision-makers navigating change, researchers pursuing projects, as well as funding agencies trying to prioritize where to allocate resources. The goal of this effort is to help the Western Alaska Landscape Conservation Cooperative (WALCC) meet its mission of coordinating, developing, and disseminating applied science to inform conservation in the context of climate change.

 

Suggested Citation: Brown, Casey L., Corrie Knapp, and Sarah F. Trainor. Current Coastal Change Projects and Priority Information Needs in Western Alaska. Final Project Report. Fairbanks, AK.

Project Report: Current Coastal Change Research/Management Projects and Priority Information Needs in from Cook Inlet through Southeastern Alaska

Publication Date: 
December 2016

 This report provides a synthesis of current research and management studies in the Alaska portion of the NPLCC that may (1) help to foster better coordination about coastal change in the NPLCC, (2) help practitioners and scholars learn from one another, and (3) identify information gaps that need to be addressed.

 

Suggested Citation: Swanson, Michaela M. and Sarah F. Trainor. Current Coastal Change Projects and Priority Information Needs from Cook Inlet through Southeastern Alaska. Final Project Report. Fairbanks, AK. 

Human Adaptation to Climate Change in Alaska: Overview and Recommendations for Future Research and Assessment. Technical Report #16-1

Publication Date: 
May 2017

The magnitude of climate warming in Alaska and the Arctic has been more than twice the global average, and related terrestrial and marine impacts are well established. As such, there is a need for climate adaptation as well as a need for research that directly informs adaptation practice. We report results of a pilot assessment of climate change adaptation across a range of natural resource dependent sectors in Alaska and provide recommendations for conducting climate adaptation research and assessment in Alaska. Sectors addressed include forestry/wildfire, coastal vulnerability, Native subsistence food harvest, commercial fishing, the oil and gas industry, shipping and maritime transport, and terrestrial infrastructure. Planning, research, and monitoring occur at a broad range of scales from international to local, however adaptation actions occur largely at a local scale with a few instances of state and regional scale action. Adaptation actions are analyzed according to Pelling’s (2010) classification of purposeful/ incidental, planned/ spontaneous and proactive/reactive revealing intermediary categories, further analysis of which has the potential to provide useful insights for adaptation research and action. Multi- and cross-sector research and assessment is also important in the region due to cumulative and cascading climate impacts.

Keywords: adaptation; Alaska; Arctic; assessment; climate change; multiple sectors; planning; coping; disaster risk management; boundary organizations

Recommended Citation:  Trainor, S. F., Walsh, J. E., Gamble, J. B. (2017). Human Adaptation to Climate Change in Alaska: Overview and Recommendations for Future Research and Assessment. Technical Report #16-1. International Arctic Research Center, University of Alaska Fairbanks. 

ACCAP Annual Report 2014

Publication Date: 
June 2014

The 2014 annual report to the NOAA Climate Program Office, Climate Societal Interactions, Regional Integrated Science and Assessment, covers the performance of the Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy for the period June 1, 2013 - May 31, 2013.

Wildfire and Smoke: Understanding and Predicting Hazards in Alaska

Randi Jandt, Martin Stuefer, Stacey Cooper

Tuesday, April 18, 2017 at 10:00 AM AKDT
Speaking: 
Randi Jandt, Martin Stuefer, Stacey Cooper
This webinar, organized jointly by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and the ACCAP, will focus on changing wildfire in Alaska and resulting smoke impacts to help our audience be prepared for the upcoming wildfire season.

VIIRS Imagery Applications for Fire Weather Monitoring

Curtis J. Seaman CIRA, Colorado State University

Wednesday, April 12, 2017 at 11:00 AM AKDT
Speaking: 
Curtis J. Seaman CIRA, Colorado State University
An introduction to RGB composites and an overview of applications will be discussed.

2018 National Climate Assessment (NCA): Overview, Alaska Chapter, and Public Feedback/Input for the 2018 Report

Carl Markon, Non-Federal lead, Alaska Chapter NCA4 & Fred Lipschultz, U.S. Global Change Research Program

Tuesday, February 14, 2017 at 10:00 AM AKST
Speaking: 
Carl Markon, Non-Federal lead, Alaska Chapter NCA4 & Fred Lipschultz, U.S. Global Change Research Program
The purpose of the presentation is to provide a brief background on the NCA, present some current topical areas will include, and seek public feedback.

Current Coastal Change Research/Management Projects and Priority Information Needs from Cook Inlet through Southeastern Alaska

Michaela Swanson, University of Alaska Fairbanks

Tuesday, November 8, 2016 at 10:00 AM AKST
Speaking: 
Michaela Swanson, University of Alaska Fairbanks
Research on coastal change in the north pacific has increased rapidly in recent years, making it challenging to track existing projects, understand their cumulative insights, gauge remaining research gaps, and prioritize future work.

Early evidence of climate induced ecological transformation on the Kenai Peninsula – is there a need to respond?

Dr. John Morton - Supervisory Fish & Wildlife Biologist, Kenai National Wildlife Refuge

Tuesday, May 3, 2016 at 10:00 AM AKDT
Speaking: 
Dr. John Morton - Supervisory Fish & Wildlife Biologist, Kenai National Wildlife Refuge
The impacts of a warming climate on the 6 million-acre Kenai Peninsula are already dramatic and forecasted to become even more so. The southern peninsula was the epicenter of a spruce bark beetle outbreak that culled 1 million acres of forest in 15 years.

Climate Change and Boreal Forest Fires: What does the future hold?

Mike Flannigan, University of Alberta

Tuesday, July 23, 2013 at 10:00 AM AKDT
Speaking: 
Mike Flannigan, University of Alberta
A warmer world means a longer fire season, more lightning activity and drier fuels. An enhanced fire danger rating systems that accurately predict the spatial and temporal variability in fire danger can help us adapt to a warmer world.

Snow Falling on Yellow-Cedars

Paul Hennon & Dave D'Amore, US Forest Service

Thursday, May 10, 2012 at 10:00 AM AKDT
Speaking: 
Paul Hennon & Dave D'Amore, US Forest Service
Scientists describe how they untangled climate and ecological characteristics of yellow-cedar to solve the mystery of the dying yellow-cedar forests.

Development and Application of an Integrated Ecosystem Model for Alaska

Amy Breen, Dave McGuire, Scott Rupp, Eugenie Euskerchin, Vladimir Romanovsky, Sergei Marchenko, UAF

Tuesday, April 24, 2012 at 10:00 AM AKDT
Speaking: 
Amy Breen, Dave McGuire, Scott Rupp, Eugenie Euskerchin, Vladimir Romanovsky, Sergei Marchenko, UAF
This presentation will describe the development of a dynamically linked model framework for Alaska's terrestrial ecosystems.